THE LANGUAGE

The simple fact is;

“There are roughly 6,500 spoken languages in the world today. However, about 2,000 of those languages have fewer than 1,000 speakers. The most popular language in the world is Mandarin Chinese. There are 1,213,000,000 people in the world that speak that language.”

I broach this subject in an effort to draw focus upon how our mind processes language and what language will become the dominate technological language in use, in the centuries to come.

It Won’t Be English…

The advancements in computer technology and the quest for developing a truly “thinking machine brain”, that possesses recognizable artificial intelligence, in and for…every sense of the “words”…has succumbed to the virtual mind!

The Chinese Room Argument…
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

First published Fri Mar 19, 2004; substantive revision Wed Apr 9, 2014

“The argument and thought-experiment now generally known as the Chinese Room Argument was first published in a paper in 1980 by American philosopher John Searle (1932- ). It has become one of the best-known arguments in recent philosophy. Searle imagines himself alone in a room following a computer program for responding to Chinese characters slipped under the door. Searle understands nothing of Chinese, and yet, by following the program for manipulating symbols and numerals just as a computer does, he produces appropriate strings of Chinese characters that fool those outside into thinking there is a Chinese speaker in the room. The narrow conclusion of the argument is that programming a digital computer may make it appear to understand language but does not produce real understanding. Hence the “Turing Test” is inadequate. Searle argues that the thought experiment underscores the fact that computers merely use syntactic rules to manipulate symbol strings, but have no understanding of meaning or semantics. The broader conclusion of the argument is that the theory that human minds are computer-like computational or information processing systems is refuted. Instead minds must result from biological processes; computers can at best simulate these biological processes. Thus the argument has large implications for semantics, philosophy of language and mind, theories of consciousness, computer science and cognitive science generally.

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Writing with the Veiled…